Swiss Chemical Society Fall Meeting

A large contingent from the Albrecht research group in Bern made our way down to Lausanne today for the Swiss Chemical Society’s annual Fall Meeting at EPFL. As always, it was a massive meeting, underscoring the impressive amount of chemistry research that goes on in small-but-mighty Switzerland.

The introductory speaker, Prof Emsley, highlighted some unique aspects of Swiss research, including the strong industrial presence in the country (indicated by the generous sponsorship of every session by pharmaceutical and instrumentation companies), as well as the rich international complexion of the researchers who work at the Swiss Universities and companies. More than a quarter of all researchers are non-nationals – and that is a real strength, allowing for diverse workers and ideas to come together from all over Europe and the world. Mobility and openness, in principle, allow the best people to find the best partners for their research and push forward important developments in science.

One of my colleagues presented his recent results (Angewandte Chemie), while seven of us presented posters over the extended lunchtime session. Lots of interesting conversations were had with researchers at other universities, as well as industrial chemists; in Switzerland industrial chemists are well integrated into the professional society (the SCS), which I think is beneficial to all of us, for focussing our targets and sharing the latest advances. Indeed, in addition to leading academics like Prof Karsten Meyer, we also saw presentations from the likes of Syngenta.

We got to socialise a little and explore the EPFL campus after the talks, and, in the Rolex Building, I was lucky enough to run into old friend Marie Curie! I had a colleague snap this photo of me and the other Marie Sklowdowska-Curie Fellow in the Albrecht group with our mentor! She’s everywhere!

Marie Curie and her fellows

 

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Chemistry in the Rising Sun – ICCC in Sendai

Pictures of me presenting at ICCC in SendaiI am just after returning from the 43 (and largest ever) International Conference of  coordintion Chemistry in Sendai, Japan. This year’s ICCC had an awful lot to offer, with 2,500 of us in the Sendai International Centre, and spread over up to twenty parallel session at times, there is clearly a lot happening in inorganic and coordination at the moment. Some highlights included fascinating molecular machines (with an inspiring closing address from 2016 Nobel laureate Jean-Pierre Sauvage), catalytic approaches to the challenges presented by the need to find new fuel sources for a changing world, new pincer and NHC ligands, luminescent diagnostic probes and therapeutic agents and much much more.

Me speaking from the podium in the Exhibition Hall on Thursday morning

I was privileged to get the chance to present my work in Session 38 “Organometallic complexes for synthesis and polymerisation”, to a room full of my peers and leaders in the field, including people I had interacted with during the week and who came along to see what it is I am up to in my current work! My presentation on the catalytic activity of carbohydrate-functionalised N-heterocyclic carbene complexes went very well and there were even a few useful questions that prompted a bit of discussion afterwards.

After Thursday morning, I could relax a bit more and just enjoy attending the sessions without worrying about perfecting my talk! Luckily that afternoon had also been set aside on the programme for sight-seeing, so I wandered around the site of Sendai Castle and the adjacent shrine with a few other chemists. I also got to sample the regional delicacy of beef tongue and make my own chopsticks from scratch. A nice mix of learning, culture and networking.

 

I really enjoyed catching up with old colleagues from Europe and the UK and meeting new people from both hemispheres to share ideas with (as well as a fateful trip to karaoke after the conference banquet wrapped up earlier than necessary) as well as the engaging discussions had at the poster sessions. I’m also getting better at asking questions after lectures, as my confidence in the field grows with experience!

Looking forward to the next one in Rimini!

Thanks, of course, to my Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellowship (GLYCONHC) and the European Commission for funding the work which I presented

I’m calling this photo a Bunsen Byrner

Recently I was lucky enough to get an invite to the 11th CaRLa Catalysis Winter School in Heidelberg, and it was an eye-opening and engaging week, meeting with some of the rising talents within the fields of homogenous catalysis (among others) and hearing from speakers like Mats Tilset (check out his recent article on trans-mutation of gold – a pun I really approve of) and Ilan Marek about their contributions to the field. In particular, I enjoyed having a week to spend time discussing posters with the other attendees; normally this is the most rushed part of any conference, as you try to simultaneously stand by your own poster and see as many others as possible. The Winter School invited flash presentations on all the posters, and gave ample time and coffee over which to really get into the details!

CaRLa (The Catalysis Reasearch Laboratory) is an institute at University of Heidelberg, supported by BASF, a giant of the chemical industry. As a result, the research they undertake is very aligned to real economic and market challenges. We were given a tour of the massive site at Ludwigshafen on the river Rhine, and the scale of production in just the one plant we visited was staggering – round-bottom flasks just can’t compete with building-sized reactors!

One interesting historical note about Heidelberg is that it is where Robert Bunsen did much of his pioneering work in 19th century chemistry and – famously – gifting us with the most widely known (and least widely-used nowadays) apparatus of the chemistry lab. I couldn’t walk past his statue without getting a punny selfie- the “Bunsen Byrner”!

CASE 2015 on the Cover of Supramolecular Chemistry

It was great to read a comprehensive write-up of CASE2015 in Supramolecular Chemistry (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10610278.2016.1150595). I designed the website for this conference and helped out with logistics. Many of the photos that appear in the article were taken by me – great that they can be used to show the community how productive a few days it was.

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Gunnlaugsson Group, Trinity College Dublin

img_7678 This month’s cover of Supramolecular Chemistry

This month’s issue of the Taylor & Francis journal Supramolecular Chemistry features a review on CASE 2015 by Robert Elmes, with a picture from the conference on the cover. CASE 2015  (Catalysis and Sensing for our Environment) was part-hosted in Trinity College Dublin, and organised by Thorri, along with Aisling Hume (TCD), Donal O’Shea (RCSI), and Robert Elmes (Maynooth).

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It was great news today to hear the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to some pioneers in the field of supramolecular chemistry: Jean-Pierre Sauvage, J Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa. During my PhD studies, I read the work of Sauvage and Stoddart a lot for inspiration; they are constantly producinSauvage's article in Tetrahedron Letters 1983g beautiful and elegant structures from discrete molecular units interacting in controlled ways. While most of my PhD ended up focussing on lanthanide-directed self assembly and luminescent compounds, I was always chasing the goal of interlocked structures and remember being fascinated by Sauvage’s early results describing the first metal-directed catenanes (Tetrahedron Letters 1983), mechanically interlocked rings with no chemical bonds between the two molecular components. This article laid the groundwork for the tiny molecular machines for which the trio were given the prestigious award today. Stoddart’s contributions to controlling rotaxane movement and Feringa’s publication of the first ‘molecular motor’ were remarkable breakthroughs, but the elegance of interlocked systems has fascinated me since I first saw them and I was delighted to finally publish some of my own work on catenanes in Angewandte Chemie this year, contributing in a small way to the ever-expanding supramolecular field.

To end this post, I’ll add a quote from my PhD supervisor Prof Thorri Gunnlaugsson (Trinity College Dublin) talking today about Sir JF Stoddart, a man he greatly admires and who received an honorary doctorate from Trinity a few years ago:

Speaking about the significance of the work that led to him sharing the 2016 Nobel Prize, Professor of Chemistry at Trinity, Thorri Gunnlaugsson, said: This is truly a fantastic day for chemists and specially for those of us who are involved in the development of supramolecular and nano-chemistry. The development of molecules that are functional and can carry out actions such as programmed operations, and can mimic macroscopic function on the nanoscale, such as that of machines, has been at the heart of this area of chemistry.”

“Today’s announcement of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry being awarded to Professors Stoddart, Sauvage and Feringa, for their development of molecular machines, acknowledges the major scientific achievement made to date in this important field.”

 

 

80 Days featured on Broadsheet.ie

Irish “news source for the bemused” Broadsheet.ie has given a plug to our podcast 80 Days, which – I think – means we’ve definitely made it! I’m a big fan of Broadsheet’s mixture of hard-hitting corruption exposés, parish bulletin-board style notices about lost bikes and things involving Irish people all over the world. It makes for the ideal combination of news and humour for my generation.

Their article focusses on the fact that Luke, Mark and I are all Irish men abroad, using this medium to explore the world and maintain connections around it. I think (and hope) our project will resonate with a lot of people. You can read it by clicking on this link.

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S1E06: Liberia

This is probably the darkest history we’ve researched while doing “80 Days”, including civil war, cannibalism and the Ebola epidemic, but still makes for a fascinating listen in spite of that.

80 Days

Audio: S1E06 Liberia

This week in 80 Days, we looked at Liberia, a small country on the west coast of Africa. Founded by freed American and Caribbean slaves, Liberia is Africa’s oldest republic and takes its name from the the Latin phrase meaning “Land of the Free.” Unfortunately, the country is best known for a long and bloody civil war that look place in the 1990s and 2000s, and more recently for the Ebola epidemic of 2014. The lush, rainforested country is just 700 kilometres or 430 miles north of the equator, and is bordered by Sierra Leone to its west, Guinea to its north and Ivory Coast (Côte d’Ivoire) to its east. Today, the country is home to around 4.5 million inhabitants, although most are native Africans rather than the descendants of freed slaves. It maintains strong ties to America, and even has…

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